Renat and Rasul, of Oasis’ House Kairat, are finishing up their first year of technical school, passing their finals exams with an overall grade B.  Things are hopeful for these two, as it looks like they will soon be getting some practical experience and a chance to work with a well-known contracting company.  

Rasul’s 11 year old cousin, Asel, was not in as good a situation.  After growing up with an alcoholic aunt and living with a mother who worked out of her home as a prostitute, Asel was spending more and more time on the streets.  Fearing that the young girl was already the victim of abuse, we acted and were able to get her out of a dangerous situation and into a home for street children, where she is very happy and going to school.   We are considering moving her into our House Erkindik for the summer. 

In an effort to prevent these incidents from happening in the first place, the START FREEDOM campaign in Kyrgyzstan has been recruiting students (11-17 years old) to teach in classrooms, raising awareness about the dangers and realities of human trafficking.  They have been able to reach over 9,000 Kyrgyz students in this fervent campaign.  Further prevention efforts have set Oasis’ eyes on a suspicious Turkish tour agency who has been offering jobs to women in Kyrgyzstan.  They are not registered with the government and are not requiring applicants to know English or Turkish.  Furthermore, there are no contracts drawn up once the job is acquired.   

With all these red flags waving, we began working within the community to warn women about the risk they would be taking with this organization.  Since these talks have begun, many women have withdrawn their applications.  With 4,000-6,000 Kyrgyz citizens being trafficked every year, we can not afford to take any chances.  

Oasis Kyrgyzstan Update (Shorter Version)

Kyrgyzstan has been a busy place for Oasis these past few months.  Two of our boys from House Kairat have just passed final exams for their first year of technical school and are looking at getting some practical experience and work with a well-known contracting company.  One of these boys was concerned for his eleven year old cousin who was living in a home where alcoholism and prostitution was commonplace.  Fearing that she was already the victim of abuse, we acted to get her into a home for street children, where she is very happy and attending school. 
In an effort to prevent these sorts of incidents from happening in the first place, our START FREEDOM campaign in Kyrgyzstan has been recruiting students (11-17 years old) to teach in classrooms, raising awareness about the dangers and realities of human trafficking.   Further prevention efforts have set Oasis’ eyes on a suspicious, unregistered Turkish tour agency who has been offering jobs to women in Kyrgyzstan, not requiring them to sign paperwork or know Turkish or English.  We have convinced many women, who had previously applied, to withdraw their applications.  With 4,000-6,000 Kyrgyz citizens being trafficked every year, we can not afford to take any chances.